Jaime Bailey

Best Practices in Web Callback

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PPC & Display Ad Management

If it feels like everyone has a smartphone these days, it’s because they do.

In the United States, smartphone usage has grown—and continues to grow—to record heights. For contact centers, that means that the overwhelming majority of customers and prospects have a web browser at their fingertips, at all times. And considering the rise of mobile web traffic, contact centers simply can’t afford not to provide a seamless transition from browsing the web to initiating a voice call.

Customers and prospects expect you to meet them where they are, not the other way around. But with so many different devices and digital channels, you need a dynamic tool that successfully bridges the web-to-voice chasm.

Fortunately, there is such a tool, and it’s called web callback. Let’s dive deeper into three use cases for web callback.

Use Case #1: Potential Customer is Evaluating Your Product on the Web

Imagine a customer who is considering your product and a few others. For argument’s sake, let’s say the product is one that will probably require a fair amount of either regular or intermittent support. In the tech world, this is very common. Think of SaaS vendors such as Salesforce whose customers must be educated about the Salesforce platform to truly get the most out of their purchase.

The customer who is browsing the web, evaluating your product, as more than 90% of customers do, is going to consider what his or her customer support experience is going to be like. If they’re browsing your website and see that they can request a callback via your website, that’s at least a few points in your favor. Plus, if they go through the extra step of initiating a call, they can see that—thanks to web callback—they don’t have to wait on hold.

In this scenario, web callback isn’t just a better way to connect… it’s a major selling point for your product.  

Use Case #2: A Frustrated Customer Needs to Solve a Problem

Every experienced service agent knows this scenario: a customer has been trying to solve a problem, then, in a fit of frustration, they decide to place a call to support. What happens after they make the decision to call customer support becomes a turning point. Things will either spiral out of control into a very negative experience or the situation will be quickly diffused.

Web callback is instrumental in defusing this type of situation because the already-frustrated customer doesn’t have to fumble around looking for a way to call your company. As soon as he or she makes the decision to call, he or she can initiate that call without needing to search around.

This is especially true because a customer who is trying to solve a problem is probably already on your website looking through support documentation. And your web callback feature is waiting for them.

Plus, because this technology is integrated with your contact center, your service agents can actually see where the customer was on your website and what pages they visited. That way, the agent has a head start because they have informative context about what the problem may be even before they speak to the frustrated customer. This allows them to defuse the situation as quickly as possible by taking care of the issue with little effort on the part of the customer.

Use Case #3: Your Customers Don’t Want to Wait on Hold but You’re Understaffed

Have you ever met someone who enjoyed waiting on hold? Neither have we, and we’re not holding our breath. Fortunately, web callback helps ensure your customers don’t have to wait on hold, even during times when call volume is abnormally high. It does this by providing your contact center with the capability to create a virtual queue and/or schedule a call back at a later time.

So when your prospects are customers are browsing the web, all they have to do to make a call is initiate it through your website. In fact, they can choose between an ASAP callback or schedule a call for later. That way, it’s possible for even understaffed contact centers to handle high call volumes without angering customers by leaving them on hold.

Wondering How Else Web Callback Can Elevate the Performance of Your Contact Center?

As you can imagine, specific use cases may vary depending on the company, customers, and product. But, the concept of providing a seamless Web-to-voice connection to facilitate more efficient contact center communications is an idea that has universal appeal to customers and contact centers alike.

In fact, once you try web callback and see the many ways it can flex to meet your unique needs, you’ll begin to truly see its value. And that’s why we encourage you to read more about web callback technology so you can continue to imagine the new possibilities it can bring to your brand.


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