Ashley Frazier

How to Build a Customer Perception Questionnaire

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Building a customer perception survey is a great way to gauge how satisfied your customers are. The goal here is to measure your customers perceptions towards your brand – how they feel, what they love about it and what can be changed to make it better. Including the right questions is essential to getting the most useful information out of your survey, so let’s review how to create an impactful customer perceptions survey by looking at the main types of questions you should be asking.

Overall ratings or satisfaction questions

These questions focus on the overall satisfaction level and value the customers received from your company or contact center. This will give a measurement of how well the company or contact center is doing when offering its services to customers. These questions will typically give insight into and rate each major customer service dimension by giving customers answers choices like ‘Highly satisfied’, ‘Satisfied’, ‘Neutral’, ‘Unsatisfied’ and ‘Highly unsatisfied’.

Example: How would you rate the quality and value of our customer contact center?

Dimension factor rating questions

These questions focus on specific dimensions within customer service. They should highlight specific attributes of the customer service center and be aligned with goals or objectives. Some examples include: responsiveness, promptness, knowledge level, courtesy, accuracy, attention to detail, etc.

Example: How satisfied are you with ___________?

(Very Satisfied, Satisfied, Neutral, Dissatisfied, Very Dissatisfied)

Behavioral questions

Behavioral questions focus on how your customers may act after an interaction with your company or contact center or after a purchase. This includes ho likely those customers are to recommend your services to others and if those customers are likely to purchase again in the future.

Example: What is the likelihood of you recommending the product/service to someone?

These questions can be measured on a scale of 1 to 10, where 1 would stand for ‘Not at all likely’ and 10 would stand for ‘Extremely Likely’.

Open-ended questions

Open-ended questions give customers more freedom in their answers, giving them the ability to explain the ‘why’ behind their ratings. These comments or explanations can lead to deeper insights into what the customer is looking for or expecting from your customer contact center.

Example: Please share a few things that we can do better for our customers in the future.

Demographic questions

Although these questions aren’t going to give you direct answers for improvement like open-ended questions will, the information is still very useful, especially when segmenting customer lists according to their responses, researching trends / patterns and developing customer personas.

Examples: Age, Location, Products / Services used, Gender, Position title

Other types of questions that can be asked

  • Comparison with competitors – Asking if the customer has had experience with a competitor and how it compared to their experience with your company.
  • Experienced-based – How familiar they were with your products / services prior to purchasing.

Creating a customer perception survey can give your company important data about how your customers view your brand. This survey should be filled out by both your customers as well as members of your team so that the answers can be compared to each other in order to see if there is any disconnect between the two. You can use this information to make positive changes within your operations and processes, create goals for your team and ultimately improve how your brand is perceived.

If you’d like to learn more about how our technology can help improve how your customers perceive your company, please reach out to us for more details.


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